New Jersey Law Requires Photocopiers and Scanners To Be Erased Because Of Privacy ConcernsNJ Assembly Bill A-1238 requires the destruction of records stored on digital copy machines under certain circumstances in order to prevent identity theft

By Alice Cheng

Last week, the New Jersey Assembly passed Bill-A1238 in an attempt to prevent identity theft. This bill requires that information stored on photocopy machines and scanners to be destroyed before devices change hands (e.g., when resold or returned at the end of a lease agreement).

Under the bill, owners of such devices are responsible for the destruction, or arranging for the destruction, of all records stored on the machines. Most consumers are not aware that digital photocopy machines and scanners store and retain copies of documents that have been printed, scanned, faxed, and emailed on their hard drives. That is, when a document is photocopied, the copier’s hard drive often keeps an image of that document. Thus, anyone with possession of the photocopier (i.e., when it is sold or returned) can obtain copies of all documents that were copied or scanned on the machine. This compilation of documents and potentially sensitive information poses serious threats of identity theft.

Any willful or knowing violation of the bill’s provisions may result in a fine of up to $2,500 for the first offense and $5,000 for subsequent offenses. Identity theft victims may also bring legal action against offenders.

In order for businesses to avoid facing these consequences, they should be mindful of the type of information stored, and to ensure that any data is erased before reselling or returning such devices. Of course, business owners should be especially mindful, as digital copy machines  may also contain trade secrets and other sensitive business information as well.

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