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New Jersey Sues App Developer for COPPA violation

Company allegedly collected information from toddlers and children in kindergarten through 2nd grade, including first and last names,  a picture and other information.

By Alice Cheng

New Jersey Attorney General Jeffrey Chiesa and the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs have filed suit against Los Angeles-based mobile app developer, 24×7 digital, for allegedly violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), a federal privacy law.

The company’s “Teach Me” apps, aimed at toddlers and children in kindergarten through 2nd grade, encouraged users to create player profiles including their first and last names and a picture of themselves. Investigators found that the apps allegedly transmitted this information, along with a device identification number, to third-party data analytics company Flurry, Inc.

Under COPPA regulations, which apply to the online collection of personal information from children under age 13 by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction, direct notice to parents must be provided and verifiable parental consent must first be obtained before collecting personal information on children. Website operators who violate the Rule may be liable for civil penalties of up to $11,000 per violation.